Resolve the Impossible

goalsEvery year we make the same old resolutions then wonder why we fail to keep them.

I wonder if we don’t keep these resolutions because they’re not good enough.

Usually our resolutions aren’t made in order to change our lives – they’re made in order to accommodate our lifestyle, and let’s face it, not many of us are happy with our current 9-5 lives.

Many of us are slouching around just to get to work on time, tune out on our lunch break, curse at the traffic on our way home, and endure screaming kids and crying babies during half-eaten dinners.

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And yet, our resolution is to simply get a raise or lose a few pounds?

I think it’s time to set our expectations – and our hopes – a little higher.

One thing I ask most people I encounter is, “What do you really want to do?” I’ve gotten answers from being a bus driver to being an actor on SNL! But I’ve never been told that they’re already doing it.polevault1

When it comes to setting any sort of resolution, we’ve got to set the bar impossibly high, because whether you achieve that goal or not, the steps to get you there are assuredly higher than where you’re at now.

For instance, my life goal, decided earlier this year, is to be part of the story department at Pixar Animation Studios. I want to work alongside my heroes, John Lasseter, Brad Bird, Andrew Stanton, Pete Docter, and others.

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Realistically, will this happen? Probably not. But that’s not going to stop me from working toward it. And how do I go about doing that? I write fiction.

And not just any fiction. I’m very specific in choosing book topics. Just like Pixar movies are very diverse in their genres, my two published books are also diverse, one being a fantasy/thriller, and the other being a coming-of-age drama.

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The two books I’m currently working on are even more diverse: A teen book set in modern times with a hint of fantasy, and a young reader’s book set in 1940’s Germany.

But they all have one thing in common: Any reader, despite age or gender, can engage with my stories just as Pixar movies attract audiences of every kind.

In the process of earning my place at the Braintrust table at Pixar, I’m developing my skills, showing the world, and myself, that I have what it takes. And so in writing these books, who knows, I just might hit the New York Times Bestsellers list, which happens to be another goal of mine.

I don’t have all the kinks and technicalities worked out, but I am busy building my portfolio with storytelling projects, showcasing my skills.

Tap in to your inner child this week and ask yourself where you’d like to be in five years, and start taking baby steps, strides, or great leaps to achieve that goal.

And remember, the bigger and more impossible the dream, the more likely you are to find success along the way.

Published by Andrew Toy

Writer when I'm not being a husband or dad. So mostly just a husband and dad.

18 thoughts on “Resolve the Impossible

  1. Do you think that people don’t stick to their resolutions because their goals have to do with processes – losing weight, for example – rather than events? Interesting that you see your writing as steps to your ultimate goal rather than goals in and of themselves. So a great big hmmm from me!! Hope the New Year brings you all your dreams!

  2. “When it comes to setting any sort of resolution, we’ve got to set the bar impossibly high, because whether you achieve that goal or not, the steps to get you there are assuredly higher than where you’re at now.”

    I don’t think I have ever heard anything quite like this, because most people don’t allow for a ‘sort of’ resolution. It is either all or nothing and if you backslide, it is nothing.

    But you are really right. Aim high, because on the way to getting there you will be changed and your life will be better, even if the baby steps to your ultimate goal are small. Because you have to start somewhere and on the way, one of those baby steps might lead you to a direction you hadn’t thought about before!

    Thanks for these thoughts. So helpful!

  3. I never make new year’s resolutions because I think if you really want to make a change, then you do it no matter what time of the year it is. Why wait until new year’s to make a resolution? I think it is better to make “resolutions” when your heart really is in it.
    As you wrote, new year’s resolutions usually fail – and that is because they are usually done without real conviction behind them.

  4. Reblogged this on Growing The Happy Tree and commented:
    “Every year we make the same old resolutions then wonder why we fail to keep them.
    I wonder if we don’t keep these resolutions because they’re not good enough.”
    A very relevant and timely post.
    Andrew Toy ladies and gentlemen. An author to look out for 🙂

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